Do we really need Government (no)?

As I've been saying for years in countless of webinars and open debates, the problem is not which ''party'' or ''who'' is incharge of the Government but the issue is government? Now, on thisvideo, Larken Rose dismantles one of the world's deepest and most dangerous superstitions: that human being need "governing" in order to be safe and prosperous. Governments are, in fact, the greatest source of violence and criminality on the planet. Organized crime can't hold a candle to them. And what do we get in return? A whole lot less than you think? Lets take Somalia for example, who has flourished and improved by mamy percent since abolishing their Government and practicing self determination thanks to Xeer. Xeer, pronounced [ħeːr], is the polycentric legal system of Somalia. Under this system, elders serve as judges and help mediate cases using precedents.[1] It is an example of how customary law works within a stateless society and closely resembles the natural law principle. Several scholars have noted that even though Xeer may be centuries old, it has the potential to serve as the legal system of a modern, well-functioning economy. According to one report, the Somali nation did not begin with the common use of the Somali language by the clans, but rather with the collective observance of Xeer. Xeer is thus referred to as being both the father and child of the Somali nation. An analogous phenomenon is said to have occurred among the neighboring Oromo nation, which is now under Ethiopian rule.[4] Under Xeer, there is no authority that dictates what the law should be. The law is instead discovered by judges as they determine the best way to resolve a dispute. As such, the Somali nation by tradition is a stateless society; that is, Somalis have never accepted the authority of any central government, their own or any other.[4] Under Xeer law, Somalia forms a kritarchy and conforms in many respects to natural law. The lack of a central governing authority means that there is a slight variation in the interpretation of Xeer amongst different communities. The laws that are widely accepted are called xeer guud and those particular to a specific community are referred to as xeer tolnimo.[6] As with law systems in Western states, the Xeer legal system also demands a certain amount of specialization of different functions within the legal framework. Thus, one can find odayal (judges), xeer boggeyaal (jurists), guurtiyaal (detectives), garxajiyaal (attorneys), murkhaatiyal (witnesses) and waranle (police officers) to enforce the law.

DON’T PANIC?